The 1741 coronation ceremony of Empress Maria Theresa in Bratislava. This painting is by Johann Daniel Herz. The expulsion of Jews from Prague, Bohemia and Moravia by Empress Maria Theresa in late 1744 and 1745 demonstrated her anti-Semitism, despite her personal affection for Baron d'Aguilar (see ref 66). Though the 1744 order for expulsion from Prague was partially revoked a few years later (ref 96 p37) conditions were tense at best for Jews in Prague.   The Austro-Hungarian Empire as it existed just before the First World War. The loss of most of its Italian territories occurred in the 1800s but the Italian Tyrol, and the Trieste region, was lost after the First World War. Bratislava is on the Danube between Vienna and Budapest. It was the capital of Hungary during the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Bratislava is known as Pressburg in German and Poesing in Hungarian. Timisoara, the residence of Moritz Baruh after he left Livorno, is in the western part of Romania not far from Belgrade.

 

 

 From his wife's gravestone we know Simon Barrow was Shimon bar Baruch ie his father was Baruch and thus an Ashkenasi probably from the Empire. We suggest that Simon Barrow of Barbados 1709-1801 had a brother Moses, who as Moritz Baruh entered the Hungarian Jewish industrial aristocracy via Timisoara which was extracted from the Ottoman Empire in 1716. Certainly another brother Gedalia moved to Prague (from Livorno) and whilst the expulsion of Jews from Prague in 1745 was followed by a partial re-admittance to Bohemia in 1748, after this drama Gedalia evidently was a long-term resident in Prague for Simon's will places him there. Baron Lyon de Symons, whose daughter Tryphena married Simon Barrow of Bath, was born in Bratislava in 1743. His Jewish name was Judah bar Simon - which prompts us to explore whether he was already related to his son-in-law.

 In the 1990s Istvan Lousadai Es Dirsztai Letay was an educated multi-lingual hotel porter in Budapest. Peter Lousada made a business trip to Budapest and whilst not actually encountering Istvan thinks his name was noticed by him. Later after Peter retired, Richard de Dirsztay made contact and produced an extraordinary and ambitious family tree (5MB) on which Istvan can be found. Like all traditional family trees it contains vast gaps and errors but also guidance for study. In it he gives a Moritz Baruh - with a Baruch Lousada ancestry that is incorrect - who came to Hungary in the mid-1700s and, after the 23 Jul 1787 law requiring German surnames be adopted, he and his family became Fisch/Fischl/Fischers. His descendant Lajos became a financial backer of the nationalist Lajos Kossuth but suffered imprisonment under Austrian rule and died soon after in 1855. He shows a further descendant Erno (son of Jakob Cole de Leto) who in 1922 was given permission to call himself Erno Letay de Losada, and in 1924 was given permission to style himself Nagymeltosagos Losadai es Dirsztai Letay Erno with Losada arms and motto. He became a member of Parliament but he resigned in 1938 on the passing of the Second Jewish Law and unfortunately on 13 Jan 1939 he took his own life on the passing of the Third Jewish Law. The porter was Erno's son. Peter Lousada advises that he found in the St Matthias Church in Obuda next to the Hilton Hotel numerous coats of arms high in the eaves inside the church and while the Lousada doves and the blue ground were clear, nothing else was! Peter says a return visit with a telescope is indicated.

There seems to be only one way the Dirsztay/Baruch Lousada link could have arisen and it is mutually supportive of our suggested early Barrow/Lousada link. That is, Moritz Baruh being Moses bar Baruch was a brother of Simon Barrow of Barbados. We have extracted from Richard's tree a summary chart of how Istvan and Richard descend from Moritz Baruh. In this chart we also show Bela de Dirsztay, who is the ancestor of Scott McDonald's wife; Scott has been in contact.